Cannabis

Cannabis for Eczema: A Quest for Relief

mmj blog eczema relief

When it comes to eczema, the itch factor is only one of the many things that can drive you crazy. The constant dryness, the burning and stinging sensations, and the accompanying weeping sores are enough to make anyone want to wring their skin dry. Luckily, there is help out there. In fact, a growing number of dermatologists believe that cannabis could be a valuable ally in your fight against eczema. But how exactly can weed help? Here’s everything you need to know about using cannabis as an eczema treatment.

What is eczema?

Eczema is a type of dermatitis that affects the skin’s layers. It is characterized by dry, itchy skin that may also develop blisters and wounds, as well as peeling skin. The condition may occur at any time of life.  In some people, it may travel to the lips, hands, and feet. Eczema is not contagious and it does not result from poor hygiene or diet. It is likely to run in families. In addition to the itchy, red, and raw skin that accompanies eczema, there is a psychological component as well. Those with eczema may experience anxiety, depression, and low self-esteem, which is why it is so important to get treatment.

Cannabis for Eczema: The Evidence

Cannabis is one of the most researched herbal medicines in the world. It is used to treat numerous conditions, including anxiety, epilepsy, and chronic pain. The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is active within the human body and interacts with the same receptors in neurons that trigger the effect of THC—the main psychoactive compound in cannabis. The ECS is found in almost every tissue in the human body and is highly active in the immune system. It has been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties that could be particularly helpful for eczema. There is also evidence to suggest that cannabinoids can modulate the immune response. For example, one study looked at the effect of using the cannabinoid cannabidiol (CBD) on eczema lesions. The researchers found that CBD had a modest anti-inflammatory effect, but also reduced the immune response to the eczema lesions, potentially reducing the severity of eczema.

Why should I care about using cannabis for eczema?

There have been numerous studies looking at the effect of cannabis on eczema. In one trial, scientists assessed the effect of inhaling cannabis on eczema in participants with existing psoriasis. The researchers found that cannabis improved both the itch and overall severity of psoriasis, but had no effect on the skin’s health. The notion that cannabinoids can be used to treat eczema has been around for a while, but the scientific evidence for this treatment is relatively new. Many people have anecdotal evidence that cannabis can help with eczema. This is especially true for those who have tried pharmaceutical treatments that have failed to produce a satisfactory result. While more research is needed in this area, it can’t hurt to try both cannabis and the other medications on the market, as well as alternative treatments, such as diet and tea.

How to use cannabis for eczema treatment

If you have mild to moderate eczema, try taking a few drops of cannabis oil in a dropper before bedtime. This can help with the skin inflammation that is often present in this form of eczema. For more severe forms of eczema, you may need to take a more aggressive approach. For example, patients with psoriasis who have tried traditional medications and are not getting better may benefit from cannabis oil that’s been vaporized or ingested via a vape pen.  You can also try topical creams.

Bottom line

Eczema is a very uncomfortable and itchy condition that can cause severe itching, pain, and infections. Fortunately, there are many ways cannabis can relieve the symptoms of this condition, including using topical ointments and creams and cannabis oil. If you think you might have eczema, you should speak to your doctor. Visit MMJExpress.cc online dispensary for all your cannabis needs.

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